Mesopotamian social pyramid

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The social pyramid of Mesopotamia is the graphic representation that shows how society was structured during the Ancient Age, in the Middle East and, more specifically, in the civilizations that developed on the banks of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. All this, depending on the decision-making power of the different social classes.

The social pyramid of Mesopotamia, in other words, shows the different classes that make up a society in this historical period, as well as their classification based on the decision-making power of each social stratum.

This type of social pyramid was present between approximately 4500 BC and 331 BC. Since it is a pyramid, its structure is hierarchical. Since, in this phase of history, as in others, estate societies predominate.

The levels of the social pyramid of Mesopotamia had differences among themselves that allowed their segmentation.

Given the above, the pyramid indicates, depending on the power of each estate, the different strata in which it is classified.

For this reason, the pyramid classifies, depending on the power of each estate, the different strata into which it is classified, and which make up, Mesopotamian society.

Mesopotamian social pyramid example

Here is an image showing a social pyramid in a Mesopotamian society:

As can be seen, the upper part of the pyramid shows how power was concentrated in the monarchy (the king), the clergy (priests) and the high nobility (warriors, among others), while the lower part concentrates all those citizens who, unlike those in higher strata, have a "lower" social status.

It should be noted, incidentally, that although we speak of a similar social structure throughout the Mesopotamian era, there are 6 empires that pass through this territory. In this sense, we speak of Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Neo-Babylonians and Persians. All of this, between 4,500 BC and 331 BC.

Estates in Mesopotamia

In terms of estates, Mesopotamian societies mainly presented the following estates:

  • King: He had all the power. It was the emperor.
  • Leading group: Formed by knights, noble characters and priests.
  • Scribes and officials: They made up the most privileged illustrious class.
  • Free people: It included peasants, merchants, artisans and ranchers.
  • Slaves: As their name suggests, they were at the service of all of the above.

Characteristics of a social pyramid in Mesopotamia

Among the characteristics of a Mesopotamian social pyramid, we can highlight the following:

  • It presents the social structure of a population between 4,500 BC and 331 BC.
  • They were estate societies.
  • Social classes are classified in descending order, with the most powerful being the one in the highest area of ​​the pyramid.
  • The king was considered a king and a god at the same time.
  • They were all due to the king.

* At this point, it should also be noted that although we speak of a similar social structure throughout the Mesopotamian era, there are 6 empires that pass through this territory.

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